Annual Report on Monroe County’s Tax Increment Finance (TIF) Districts

Tax increment finance (TIF) districts are the subject of a lot of public misunderstanding. In order to increase transparency about TIF districts, redevelopment commissions in Indiana were recently given some requirements for increased public reporting on the impacts of tax increment finance (TIF) districts on other units of local government. In the short 2018 special session, the Indiana General Assembly passed House Enrolled Act 1242, which, among other things, required that:

Each redevelopment commission shall annually present information for the governing bodies of all taxing units that have territory within an allocation area of the redevelopment commission. The presentation shall be made at a meeting of the redevelopment commission and must include the following:

(1) The commission’s budget with respect to allocated property tax proceeds.
(2) The long term plans for the allocation area.
(3) The impact on each of the taxing units.

HEA 1242 of Special Session 1 of 2018

Remember that TIF districts “capture” any growth in the assessed value of real property within the district and use it to support infrastructure in the district, rather than being used to lower the tax rates of the underlying taxing units that serve the district. These taxing units refer to other units of government, such as cities and towns, county, township, public library, etc., that have territory that overlaps a TIF district, and may have to provide services to the development within the district. 

Monroe County currently has 4 TIF districts: Westside, Fullerton Pike, State Road 46 (also sometimes referred to as North Park), and Curry-Profile (which consists of two parcels of the former GE plant purchased by Cook and moved out of the Westside district into a newly created TIF).

This past Wednesday, the Monroe County Redevelopment Commission hosted the first annual public presentation of this information, in fulfillment of the statute. All taxing units were invited to attend. I’m including a link to the presentation that was given (by Financial Solutions Group) here, because it provides a good overview of the status of current and future projects, debt, and overall cash flow of each of Monroe County’s TIF districts, as well as their impact on other taxing units. The presenter acknowledged that this was the first report for Monroe County of this kind, and that the data will be improved and presented in more detail in future years. 

In brief, the presentation outlined the following types of (positive) impacts that the underlying units of government see from the TIF districts (in greatly varying degrees):

  • Personal Property: TIF districts typically capture only the grown of assessed value of real property (buildings and structures), not personal property (equipment used in producing income). However, factories and other businesses typically employ a lot of personal property as well (machines, IT equipment, etc.). So the assessed value of the personal property does accrue to the other taxing units, and thereby goes to reduce their tax rates
  • Circuit Breaker: Due to the aforementioned growth in personal property typically associated with growth in TIF districts, the tax rates are slightly lower than they would have been, and therefore the circuit breakers (constitutional tax caps) are slightly lower, leading to a bit more revenue for the other taxing units. Note that this effect, while positive, is generally quite small.
  • Income Tax: With employment associated with growth in TIF districts comes local income tax (LIT), which benefits all taxing districts. Note that this income tax only goes to Monroe County taxing units if the employee earning the wages lives in Monroe County.

The presentation to the Redevelopment Commission is also available on CATS.

I want to mention a big caveat, though. There is a big omission in this type of analysis, and that is the additional costs to the other units of government caused by development in the TIF districts. To understand the impact of these costs would require a case-by-case assessment. For example, the impact on the Monroe County Public Library by the industrial development in the Westside TIF is negligible/zero. On the other hand, the same development puts significant additional responsibilities on the Ellettsville Fire Department (which serves Richland Township, by contract).  A more comprehensive understanding of the impact of TIF on other governmental units needs to take these additional costs into account.

Note: in the presentation above, the Curry-Profile Allocation Area is referred to as the Cook Allocation Area. While Cook is the sole property owner in the TIF district, the official name is Curry-Profile.

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